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  • @remotexpeditions 
When there’s so many overly photographed places in Chefchaouen, it’s special when all the wandering around leads to a hidden gem. The sidelight enhanced the unreal blue shapes and hues. This city is a true living and breathing painting. by @joelsantosphoto 🎨 #remotexpeditions #morocco
  • @remotexpeditions
    When there’s so many overly photographed places in Chefchaouen, it’s special when all the wandering around leads to a hidden gem. The sidelight enhanced the unreal blue shapes and hues. This city is a true living and breathing painting. by @joelsantosphoto 🎨 #remotexpeditions #morocco
  • 3,385 37 19 January, 2019
  • @remotexpeditions 
I was fortunate to see Lion Dancers from the Sakuma tribe perform the story of their lion killing outside a village in rural Tanzania. #Liondancers are men who have killed a lion in defense of their cattle or their village. Once they have proved themselves, they can then be hired to perform this service for others and this is where things get complicated for conservation. They are a deeply superstitious people who believe that once they have killed a lion they have to become a lion dancer for 3 to 5 years to avoid going mad. They spend a year or longer preparing with the local witchdoctor and then go from village to village seeing their relatives and dancing while collecting tribute for their bravery. In a time when lion are very scarce in the region, this practice is actively discouraged by conservation organizations and it is slowly dying out. When the dancers appear in the villages, they are often praised and given money, goats and even sometimes a small cow. by @brentstirton 🙌🏽 #remotexpeditions  #tanzania
  • @remotexpeditions
    I was fortunate to see Lion Dancers from the Sakuma tribe perform the story of their lion killing outside a village in rural Tanzania. #Liondancers are men who have killed a lion in defense of their cattle or their village. Once they have proved themselves, they can then be hired to perform this service for others and this is where things get complicated for conservation. They are a deeply superstitious people who believe that once they have killed a lion they have to become a lion dancer for 3 to 5 years to avoid going mad. They spend a year or longer preparing with the local witchdoctor and then go from village to village seeing their relatives and dancing while collecting tribute for their bravery. In a time when lion are very scarce in the region, this practice is actively discouraged by conservation organizations and it is slowly dying out. When the dancers appear in the villages, they are often praised and given money, goats and even sometimes a small cow. by @brentstirton 🙌🏽 #remotexpeditions #tanzania
  • 2,438 11 18 January, 2019
  • @remotexpeditions 
Whilst few young Bajau are now born on boats, the ocean is still very much their playground. And whilst they are getting conflicted messages from their communities, who simultaneously refrain from spitting in the ocean and continue to dynamite its reefs, I still believe they could play a crucial role in the development of western marine conservation practices. Here Enal plays with his pet shark. by @jamesmorganfoto 🔝🐠 #remotexpeditions #borneo
  • @remotexpeditions
    Whilst few young Bajau are now born on boats, the ocean is still very much their playground. And whilst they are getting conflicted messages from their communities, who simultaneously refrain from spitting in the ocean and continue to dynamite its reefs, I still believe they could play a crucial role in the development of western marine conservation practices. Here Enal plays with his pet shark. by @jamesmorganfoto 🔝🐠 #remotexpeditions #borneo
  • 3,785 49 18 January, 2019
  • @remotexpeditions 
In the Menit tribe, women do not use blades to make scarifications, but scratch their skins with stones to decorate it. The wounds are deep and change the color 
of their skin. Tum, Ethiopia. by @ericlafforgue 👧🏽 #remotexpeditions #ethiopia
  • @remotexpeditions
    In the Menit tribe, women do not use blades to make scarifications, but scratch their skins with stones to decorate it. The wounds are deep and change the color
    of their skin. Tum, Ethiopia. by @ericlafforgue 👧🏽 #remotexpeditions #ethiopia
  • 1,550 19 17 January, 2019