#fern Instagram Photos & Videos

fern - 745.1k posts

Top Posts

  • Western sword fern (polystichum munitum) 🌿 While much of the forest hibernates, trusty sword fern is out here keeping it magical with its evergreen foliage. One of the most common sights in Western American landscapes, and naturalized in some of Western Europe, sword fern is widespread out west but very difficult to cultivate on the east coast. It likes well-draining soil, cool temperatures, and moderate sunlight, making it right at home in our perfectly cool, foggy PNW forests. It's also a great choice for your home garden if you're on the west coast.✨
  • Western sword fern (polystichum munitum) 🌿 While much of the forest hibernates, trusty sword fern is out here keeping it magical with its evergreen foliage. One of the most common sights in Western American landscapes, and naturalized in some of Western Europe, sword fern is widespread out west but very difficult to cultivate on the east coast. It likes well-draining soil, cool temperatures, and moderate sunlight, making it right at home in our perfectly cool, foggy PNW forests. It's also a great choice for your home garden if you're on the west coast.✨
  • 1,545 14 8 February, 2019
  • Hey there, chubby-plant lovers! I forgot to post this yesterday for #ThatsNotASucculentSunday ! This stunning plant is a staghorn fern, seen here at the San Diego botanical gardens !

Platycerium is a genus of about 18 fern species. Ferns in this genus are widely known as staghorn or elkhorn ferns thanks to their uniquely shaped fronds, resembling taxidermy when mounted! This genus is epiphytic, growing on trees in tropical and temperate areas of South America, Africa, Southeast Asia, Australia, and New Guinea. Until recently, they were quite rare, but thanks to a species native to Australia, Platycerium Bifurcatum, which is easy to care for and propagate, they’re increasingly popular house plants! One of the reasons that staghorn fern care seems daunting is that this plant’s anatomy differs from that of most other common houseplants even other ferns. While other plant species reproduce through flowers and seeds, ferns have neither, releasing microscopic spores into the air like mushrooms and mosses do. These spores eventually become new plants! Fern leaves, called fronds, are unique in structure and staghorn ferns have two types. The first, and most prominent, is the “antler” frond! These are the large leaves that shoot out of the center of the plant, goving staghorn ferns their names, resembling the antlers of deer or moose. The second type of staghorn fern frond is called the shield frond. These are the round, harder, plate-like leaves that surround the base of the plant. Their function is to protect the plants roots, and soak up water and nutrients. These fronds start out green, but eventually turn brown and dry up, a normal part of the staghorn fern life-cycle. A brown shield frond does not mean your staghorn fern is dying, and dried shield fronds should never be removed! The final part of the staghorn fern is the root ball. Since these stunning ferns are epiphytes, their root systems are fairly minimal, only there to attach the fern to its home. Because the roots are so minimal, staghorn ferns need extensive drainage and are particularly susceptible to root rot! These plants do best mounted and hung vertically.
  • Hey there, chubby-plant lovers! I forgot to post this yesterday for #ThatsNotASucculentSunday ! This stunning plant is a staghorn fern, seen here at the San Diego botanical gardens !

    Platycerium is a genus of about 18 fern species. Ferns in this genus are widely known as staghorn or elkhorn ferns thanks to their uniquely shaped fronds, resembling taxidermy when mounted! This genus is epiphytic, growing on trees in tropical and temperate areas of South America, Africa, Southeast Asia, Australia, and New Guinea. Until recently, they were quite rare, but thanks to a species native to Australia, Platycerium Bifurcatum, which is easy to care for and propagate, they’re increasingly popular house plants! One of the reasons that staghorn fern care seems daunting is that this plant’s anatomy differs from that of most other common houseplants even other ferns. While other plant species reproduce through flowers and seeds, ferns have neither, releasing microscopic spores into the air like mushrooms and mosses do. These spores eventually become new plants! Fern leaves, called fronds, are unique in structure and staghorn ferns have two types. The first, and most prominent, is the “antler” frond! These are the large leaves that shoot out of the center of the plant, goving staghorn ferns their names, resembling the antlers of deer or moose. The second type of staghorn fern frond is called the shield frond. These are the round, harder, plate-like leaves that surround the base of the plant. Their function is to protect the plants roots, and soak up water and nutrients. These fronds start out green, but eventually turn brown and dry up, a normal part of the staghorn fern life-cycle. A brown shield frond does not mean your staghorn fern is dying, and dried shield fronds should never be removed! The final part of the staghorn fern is the root ball. Since these stunning ferns are epiphytes, their root systems are fairly minimal, only there to attach the fern to its home. Because the roots are so minimal, staghorn ferns need extensive drainage and are particularly susceptible to root rot! These plants do best mounted and hung vertically.
  • 1,122 17 19 February, 2019

Latest Instagram Posts

  • I went to go get chips and came back with a fern and no chips..... so meet my fern named chips! #plants #fern #plantmom
  • I went to go get chips and came back with a fern and no chips..... so meet my fern named chips! #plants #fern #plantmom
  • 1 0 54 seconds ago
  • Take me back to Paris with the girls! #tbt  When the wine was abundant, there were no days without cheese, endless hours 🕰 and champagne 🥂 in Chanel 👜 and our talks about how to keep frenella the fern 🌱‘moist’ gave us too many belly laughs 🤣🗼🍷 (and someone didn’t eat 1 croissant... not even a crumb! I’m not naming names😲) 🥐🥐🥐 #paris #girlstrip #girlsontour #wine #cheese #fern #croissant #toomuchfun #chanel #champagne #champers
  • Take me back to Paris with the girls! #tbt When the wine was abundant, there were no days without cheese, endless hours 🕰 and champagne 🥂 in Chanel 👜 and our talks about how to keep frenella the fern 🌱‘moist’ gave us too many belly laughs 🤣🗼🍷 (and someone didn’t eat 1 croissant... not even a crumb! I’m not naming names😲) 🥐🥐🥐 #paris #girlstrip #girlsontour #wine #cheese #fern #croissant #toomuchfun #chanel #champagne #champers
  • 7 1 10 minutes ago
  • Succulent?? More like sucCUTElent! But seriously, how awesome is this succulent!? 💚
  • Succulent?? More like sucCUTElent! But seriously, how awesome is this succulent!? 💚
  • 9 1 11 minutes ago
  • Can’t wait for those ferns to pop up soon🌿 Inspired by Spring rose Gold filled dangle earrigs ✨
  • Can’t wait for those ferns to pop up soon🌿 Inspired by Spring rose Gold filled dangle earrigs ✨
  • 2 3 22 minutes ago
  • Simple in the front, surprise on the back. 🖤🌿
  • Simple in the front, surprise on the back. 🖤🌿
  • 7 1 24 minutes ago
  • 🍎
  • 🍎
  • 8 2 41 minutes ago
  • Lauʻae Earrings. Click the photo to purchase. To see our Lauʻae Collection, click on link in bio.
  • Lauʻae Earrings. Click the photo to purchase. To see our Lauʻae Collection, click on link in bio.
  • 14 1 46 minutes ago
  • Brave New Fern, Lusk Falls, Gatineau Park
  • Brave New Fern, Lusk Falls, Gatineau Park
  • 17 4 1 hour ago
  • In awe over these Drippy Pots by @brianginiewski 🌿 We just started carrying them in store at @urbanjunglephilly and needless to say, I am amazed. The quality is impeccable and the design is incredibly niche. Cannot wait to bring one home for myself!
  • In awe over these Drippy Pots by @brianginiewski 🌿 We just started carrying them in store at @urbanjunglephilly and needless to say, I am amazed. The quality is impeccable and the design is incredibly niche. Cannot wait to bring one home for myself!
  • 318 1 1 hour ago