#filmnoirstyle Instagram Photos & Videos

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  • Went  a little extreme on set with the smoke and backlight. 🤣 But hey I love Filmnoir and I love making movies so this is what I end up with. 🎬👌🏻 Been playing with the colors on our Arri Skypanel.  It’s my favorite new toy in our kit.  Endless possibilities!  #onset #filmmakinglife #filmnoir
  • Went a little extreme on set with the smoke and backlight. 🤣 But hey I love Filmnoir and I love making movies so this is what I end up with. 🎬👌🏻 Been playing with the colors on our Arri Skypanel. It’s my favorite new toy in our kit. Endless possibilities! #onset #filmmakinglife #filmnoir
  • 1,517 172 12 September, 2018
  • The Polynesian Pop movement of midcentury America began in Hollywood. It was here that Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt, a bootlegger transplant from Texas, would open Don The Beachcomber in the corner of a small hotel bar at 1722 N. McCadden Place in 1933. The bar would become a favorite hideaway for celebrities and industry tycoons, attracting the likes of Charlie Chaplin, Howard Hughes, and Greta Garbo.
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In the late forties, Hollywood began producing a new breed of crime dramas. These films indulged in high contrast lighting, hyper-stylized voice-over narration, and a bleak tone of fatalism. This subgenre would later become known as film noir. It shares a flirtatious relationship with tiki culture that continues to this day, sometimes referred to as “Tiki Noir” or “Polynesian Pulp.” Film noir and Polynesian Pop share many interesting parallels, perhaps due to the screenwriters and directors of film noir haunting famed Los Angeles tiki bars during after-hours. Polynesian pop and film noir were both born out of a crude Western characterization of other cultures aesthetics (film noir owing it’s visualization to German Expressionist cinema, Polynesian Pop to the exoticism of the Pacific Islands), and both would have initial short lifespans, sputtering out of vogue by the sixties.
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This scene from 1950’s “Where Danger Lives,” directed by John Farrow and starring Robert Mitchum, takes place at the fictitious “Pogo Pete’s” - a midcentury tiki bar adorned with the classic beachcomber aesthetic. After Mitchum’s love interest leaves the bar prematurely, he returns to their booth to finish off the remaining tropical cocktails. When he tries to order another round, the bartender informs him, “We are only allowed to serve two per customer,” as was customary when ordering potent tiki drinks such as The Zombie. To this day, many tiki bars continue to place limitations on the number of cocktails per customer, much to the dismay of modern femme fatales and hardboiled detectives scramblin' for one last round of giggle juice before the sun rises to greet another two-bit day. #tikivintage
  • The Polynesian Pop movement of midcentury America began in Hollywood. It was here that Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt, a bootlegger transplant from Texas, would open Don The Beachcomber in the corner of a small hotel bar at 1722 N. McCadden Place in 1933. The bar would become a favorite hideaway for celebrities and industry tycoons, attracting the likes of Charlie Chaplin, Howard Hughes, and Greta Garbo.
    .
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    In the late forties, Hollywood began producing a new breed of crime dramas. These films indulged in high contrast lighting, hyper-stylized voice-over narration, and a bleak tone of fatalism. This subgenre would later become known as film noir. It shares a flirtatious relationship with tiki culture that continues to this day, sometimes referred to as “Tiki Noir” or “Polynesian Pulp.” Film noir and Polynesian Pop share many interesting parallels, perhaps due to the screenwriters and directors of film noir haunting famed Los Angeles tiki bars during after-hours. Polynesian pop and film noir were both born out of a crude Western characterization of other cultures aesthetics (film noir owing it’s visualization to German Expressionist cinema, Polynesian Pop to the exoticism of the Pacific Islands), and both would have initial short lifespans, sputtering out of vogue by the sixties.
    .
    .
    This scene from 1950’s “Where Danger Lives,” directed by John Farrow and starring Robert Mitchum, takes place at the fictitious “Pogo Pete’s” - a midcentury tiki bar adorned with the classic beachcomber aesthetic. After Mitchum’s love interest leaves the bar prematurely, he returns to their booth to finish off the remaining tropical cocktails. When he tries to order another round, the bartender informs him, “We are only allowed to serve two per customer,” as was customary when ordering potent tiki drinks such as The Zombie. To this day, many tiki bars continue to place limitations on the number of cocktails per customer, much to the dismay of modern femme fatales and hardboiled detectives scramblin' for one last round of giggle juice before the sun rises to greet another two-bit day. #tikivintage
  • 161 6 11 November, 2018

Latest Instagram Posts

  • Making an RPG is messy work.
  • Making an RPG is messy work.
  • 35 2 18 hours ago
  • Full moons demand “full moons”. Period. End stop.
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The seas are calm and the water is warm. The breeze feels delicious on my skin and all I can think of is this: I get to be here.
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At least til June.
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And I’ll take every fantastic moment with me when we head north for a hot and humid off season, fixing our boat and planning the next trip south.
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But that’s a ways off. Thank God! 💋⛵️🎸🎶
  • Full moons demand “full moons”. Period. End stop.
    -
    The seas are calm and the water is warm. The breeze feels delicious on my skin and all I can think of is this: I get to be here.
    -
    At least til June.
    -
    And I’ll take every fantastic moment with me when we head north for a hot and humid off season, fixing our boat and planning the next trip south.
    -
    But that’s a ways off. Thank God! 💋⛵️🎸🎶
  • 111 23 19 February, 2019
  • 49 4 18 February, 2019