#islamabad Instagram Photos & Videos

islamabad - 2.8m posts

Top Posts

  • 🌑
  • 🌑
  • 1,464 60 20 hours ago

Latest Instagram Posts

  • My friend Edyta, while talking about moving to a new city: "A friend if mine moved to Rotterdam. She said it's so nice, she didn't use a car for a whole year and walked everywhere".
.
And I was like, haan, when you WALK everywhere instead  of having to use the car, it is actually nice, I see it as a privilege. I do hear a lot of "haye bechari, har jaga chal chal ke jana parhta hai?" but I see it as the opposite of being bechara. It reminds of something I used to share with my students in my Development Economics lectures... When a country is developed, the rich use public transport. Or they walk. I see walking as a luxury because back home, I can't do it. I feel free to be able to just get up and walk out, not depend on anyone, not worrying about parking. I see it as a luxury because I get to breathe in fresh, pollution less air and see greenery up close. I can see when new leaves grow and old one fall off the trees. I get to use my legs and my muscles and be able to invest in them so I can inshallah keep using them in old age. I see it as a luxury to have sidewalks and a system for the pedestrian to use the roads safely, with strictly followed traffic rules as well as pedestrian rights. The environment is conducive, even when it's cold or raining. You only need to dress up properly. No one going to mug you, follow you, irritate you or harass you. No one will whistle or sing "meri aashiqi ho tum" as you walk past. You can walk back home alone, use the buses and the metro, walk through dark parks post midnight and it's SAFE. So, I see walking as a whole experience and I value it so much because I may not have this luxury for long. I see it as a sign of how this country is developed, and in area, how my country is the opposite. I truly wish to see a time in Pakistan when walking is not seen as a sign of poverty or bechargi. It is seen as a sign of freedom, safety, health and prosperity. 🇨🇭🚶‍♀️💌
.
📸 Credits: Minoo.
  • My friend Edyta, while talking about moving to a new city: "A friend if mine moved to Rotterdam. She said it's so nice, she didn't use a car for a whole year and walked everywhere".
    .
    And I was like, haan, when you WALK everywhere instead of having to use the car, it is actually nice, I see it as a privilege. I do hear a lot of "haye bechari, har jaga chal chal ke jana parhta hai?" but I see it as the opposite of being bechara. It reminds of something I used to share with my students in my Development Economics lectures... When a country is developed, the rich use public transport. Or they walk. I see walking as a luxury because back home, I can't do it. I feel free to be able to just get up and walk out, not depend on anyone, not worrying about parking. I see it as a luxury because I get to breathe in fresh, pollution less air and see greenery up close. I can see when new leaves grow and old one fall off the trees. I get to use my legs and my muscles and be able to invest in them so I can inshallah keep using them in old age. I see it as a luxury to have sidewalks and a system for the pedestrian to use the roads safely, with strictly followed traffic rules as well as pedestrian rights. The environment is conducive, even when it's cold or raining. You only need to dress up properly. No one going to mug you, follow you, irritate you or harass you. No one will whistle or sing "meri aashiqi ho tum" as you walk past. You can walk back home alone, use the buses and the metro, walk through dark parks post midnight and it's SAFE. So, I see walking as a whole experience and I value it so much because I may not have this luxury for long. I see it as a sign of how this country is developed, and in area, how my country is the opposite. I truly wish to see a time in Pakistan when walking is not seen as a sign of poverty or bechargi. It is seen as a sign of freedom, safety, health and prosperity. 🇨🇭🚶‍♀️💌
    .
    📸 Credits: Minoo.
  • 27 2 4 minutes ago