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  • There are several common green bean defects, and some are easier to spot than others. Most common defects include Primary defects (full black, full sour, pod/cherry, large stones, medium stones, large sticks, medium sticks) and Secondary defects (parchment, hull/husk, broken/chipped, insect damaged, partial sour, floater, shell, small stones, small sticks, water damage)
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Insect Damage
Classified as Secondary defects, insect damage is caused by coffee pests: the coffee beetle borer, the white stem borer, the coffee bean weevil, and so on. Coffees damaged the the coffee beetle borer (la broca) tend to be sour and earthy.
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Broken, Chipped or Cut Beans
This kind of defect normally caused by the depulping machine, Secondary defects.
.
Unhulled Beans
Unhulled beans is a secondary defect. It leads to an astringent, bitter cup. What’s more, the hull can become burnt during roasting, damaging other beans in the process.
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Full Black & Partial Black Beans
Full black beans is a primary defect, while partial black is a secondary one. The beans are brown or black, shrivelled, and with the crack too open. Causes include over fermentation, over-ripe cherries, and not enough water during cherry development.
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Full Sour & Partial Sour Beans
Full sour beans are a primary defect, while partial sour is a secondary defect. They are a light to dark brown. These defects are caused by too long a wait between picking and depulping, an overly long fermentation process, or storing the beans while they have too high a moisture content.
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#HirupSeruputBerbagi #firstcrck #firstcrackcoffee #firstcrack #kopiindonesia #academy #scacoffeeacademy #sca #roastery #roasting #coffeeroasting #bicarakopi #chef #kopi #sangrai #coffeepedia #coffeeacademic #indonesia #jakarta #sunter #pluit #sangraikopi #brew #scai #petanikopi #indonesiacoffee #manmakecoffee #anakopi
  • There are several common green bean defects, and some are easier to spot than others. Most common defects include Primary defects (full black, full sour, pod/cherry, large stones, medium stones, large sticks, medium sticks) and Secondary defects (parchment, hull/husk, broken/chipped, insect damaged, partial sour, floater, shell, small stones, small sticks, water damage)
    .
    Insect Damage
    Classified as Secondary defects, insect damage is caused by coffee pests: the coffee beetle borer, the white stem borer, the coffee bean weevil, and so on. Coffees damaged the the coffee beetle borer (la broca) tend to be sour and earthy.
    .
    Broken, Chipped or Cut Beans
    This kind of defect normally caused by the depulping machine, Secondary defects.
    .
    Unhulled Beans
    Unhulled beans is a secondary defect. It leads to an astringent, bitter cup. What’s more, the hull can become burnt during roasting, damaging other beans in the process.
    .
    Full Black & Partial Black Beans
    Full black beans is a primary defect, while partial black is a secondary one. The beans are brown or black, shrivelled, and with the crack too open. Causes include over fermentation, over-ripe cherries, and not enough water during cherry development.
    .
    Full Sour & Partial Sour Beans
    Full sour beans are a primary defect, while partial sour is a secondary defect. They are a light to dark brown. These defects are caused by too long a wait between picking and depulping, an overly long fermentation process, or storing the beans while they have too high a moisture content.
    .
    #HirupSeruputBerbagi #firstcrck #firstcrackcoffee #firstcrack #kopiindonesia #academy #scacoffeeacademy #sca #roastery #roasting #coffeeroasting #bicarakopi #chef #kopi #sangrai #coffeepedia #coffeeacademic #indonesia #jakarta #sunter #pluit #sangraikopi #brew #scai #petanikopi #indonesiacoffee #manmakecoffee #anakopi
  • 1,549 6 1 February, 2019

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  • Have you taste the difference between all of these beans? Tell us in the comment section below
  • Have you taste the difference between all of these beans? Tell us in the comment section below
  • 1,353 26 15 November, 2018

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  • Steaming milk may seem simple, but it’s remarkably difficult to do well. The key is to remember that there are two phases to steaming: aerating, which baristas call “stretching”; and emulsifying, which baristas call “texturing.” You need both to have a creamy, velvety batch of milk with enough body to create latte art or a great cappuccino. To aerate, simply place the steam wand’s tip into the milk and turn on the wand. The whirlpool of milk will capture air at the surface and incorporate it into the milk. Once you’ve mixed in some air, plunge the steam wand deeper into the milk to further stir and emulsify it. For lattes, you want only a little bit of aeration; for cappuccinos, you want a decent amount of foam.

Before steaming your milk, crank up your steam wand and let it run for a couple of seconds to purge any leftover gunk trapped in the tip and allow the wand to heat up a little. Set the wand into the milk so that the line at which the tip screws in is level with the surface of the milk. The wand should be at about a 15-degree angle from the side of the espresso machine and slightly off center in the pitcher, with the handle of the pitcher running parallel to the wand.

There are two phases to creating perfectly textured milk: aerating (also known as “stretching” in barista-speak) and emulsifying (also known as “texturing”). Stretching the milk is introducing air to create foam. You can determine whether you are creating foam by listening for popping sounds and watching for the milk volume to increase. Once the milk has increased roughly 50 percent in volume, you will drop the tip of the steam wand deeper into the pitcher until the popping sound stops and the milk starts spinning. During this stage, you want to create a flat whirlpool of milk without allowing the volume to rise any higher. If the volume continues to increase, turn the steam level down a bit.

The reason we steam milk in metal pitchers is so that we can feel the temperature as the milk heats up. Hold the pitcher from the bottom, and emulsify the milk until the temperature is just barely too hot for your hand. At that moment, turn off the steam valve and remove the pitcher (continued 👇👇)
  • Steaming milk may seem simple, but it’s remarkably difficult to do well. The key is to remember that there are two phases to steaming: aerating, which baristas call “stretching”; and emulsifying, which baristas call “texturing.” You need both to have a creamy, velvety batch of milk with enough body to create latte art or a great cappuccino. To aerate, simply place the steam wand’s tip into the milk and turn on the wand. The whirlpool of milk will capture air at the surface and incorporate it into the milk. Once you’ve mixed in some air, plunge the steam wand deeper into the milk to further stir and emulsify it. For lattes, you want only a little bit of aeration; for cappuccinos, you want a decent amount of foam.

    Before steaming your milk, crank up your steam wand and let it run for a couple of seconds to purge any leftover gunk trapped in the tip and allow the wand to heat up a little. Set the wand into the milk so that the line at which the tip screws in is level with the surface of the milk. The wand should be at about a 15-degree angle from the side of the espresso machine and slightly off center in the pitcher, with the handle of the pitcher running parallel to the wand.

    There are two phases to creating perfectly textured milk: aerating (also known as “stretching” in barista-speak) and emulsifying (also known as “texturing”). Stretching the milk is introducing air to create foam. You can determine whether you are creating foam by listening for popping sounds and watching for the milk volume to increase. Once the milk has increased roughly 50 percent in volume, you will drop the tip of the steam wand deeper into the pitcher until the popping sound stops and the milk starts spinning. During this stage, you want to create a flat whirlpool of milk without allowing the volume to rise any higher. If the volume continues to increase, turn the steam level down a bit.

    The reason we steam milk in metal pitchers is so that we can feel the temperature as the milk heats up. Hold the pitcher from the bottom, and emulsify the milk until the temperature is just barely too hot for your hand. At that moment, turn off the steam valve and remove the pitcher (continued 👇👇)
  • 1,046 18 18 February, 2019

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  • Steaming milk may seem simple, but it’s remarkably difficult to do well. The key is to remember that there are two phases to steaming: aerating, which baristas call “stretching”; and emulsifying, which baristas call “texturing.” You need both to have a creamy, velvety batch of milk with enough body to create latte art or a great cappuccino. To aerate, simply place the steam wand’s tip into the milk and turn on the wand. The whirlpool of milk will capture air at the surface and incorporate it into the milk. Once you’ve mixed in some air, plunge the steam wand deeper into the milk to further stir and emulsify it. For lattes, you want only a little bit of aeration; for cappuccinos, you want a decent amount of foam.

Before steaming your milk, crank up your steam wand and let it run for a couple of seconds to purge any leftover gunk trapped in the tip and allow the wand to heat up a little. Set the wand into the milk so that the line at which the tip screws in is level with the surface of the milk. The wand should be at about a 15-degree angle from the side of the espresso machine and slightly off center in the pitcher, with the handle of the pitcher running parallel to the wand.

There are two phases to creating perfectly textured milk: aerating (also known as “stretching” in barista-speak) and emulsifying (also known as “texturing”). Stretching the milk is introducing air to create foam. You can determine whether you are creating foam by listening for popping sounds and watching for the milk volume to increase. Once the milk has increased roughly 50 percent in volume, you will drop the tip of the steam wand deeper into the pitcher until the popping sound stops and the milk starts spinning. During this stage, you want to create a flat whirlpool of milk without allowing the volume to rise any higher. If the volume continues to increase, turn the steam level down a bit.

The reason we steam milk in metal pitchers is so that we can feel the temperature as the milk heats up. Hold the pitcher from the bottom, and emulsify the milk until the temperature is just barely too hot for your hand. At that moment, turn off the steam valve and remove the pitcher (continued 👇👇)
  • Steaming milk may seem simple, but it’s remarkably difficult to do well. The key is to remember that there are two phases to steaming: aerating, which baristas call “stretching”; and emulsifying, which baristas call “texturing.” You need both to have a creamy, velvety batch of milk with enough body to create latte art or a great cappuccino. To aerate, simply place the steam wand’s tip into the milk and turn on the wand. The whirlpool of milk will capture air at the surface and incorporate it into the milk. Once you’ve mixed in some air, plunge the steam wand deeper into the milk to further stir and emulsify it. For lattes, you want only a little bit of aeration; for cappuccinos, you want a decent amount of foam.

    Before steaming your milk, crank up your steam wand and let it run for a couple of seconds to purge any leftover gunk trapped in the tip and allow the wand to heat up a little. Set the wand into the milk so that the line at which the tip screws in is level with the surface of the milk. The wand should be at about a 15-degree angle from the side of the espresso machine and slightly off center in the pitcher, with the handle of the pitcher running parallel to the wand.

    There are two phases to creating perfectly textured milk: aerating (also known as “stretching” in barista-speak) and emulsifying (also known as “texturing”). Stretching the milk is introducing air to create foam. You can determine whether you are creating foam by listening for popping sounds and watching for the milk volume to increase. Once the milk has increased roughly 50 percent in volume, you will drop the tip of the steam wand deeper into the pitcher until the popping sound stops and the milk starts spinning. During this stage, you want to create a flat whirlpool of milk without allowing the volume to rise any higher. If the volume continues to increase, turn the steam level down a bit.

    The reason we steam milk in metal pitchers is so that we can feel the temperature as the milk heats up. Hold the pitcher from the bottom, and emulsify the milk until the temperature is just barely too hot for your hand. At that moment, turn off the steam valve and remove the pitcher (continued 👇👇)
  • 1,046 18 18 February, 2019