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  • i want to scream at the top of my lungs
  • i want to scream at the top of my lungs
  • 412 10 8 hours ago
  • ‘S’

Wrought iron goodness in another beautiful derelict apartment block in #Tbilisi #georgia🇬🇪
  • ‘S’

    Wrought iron goodness in another beautiful derelict apartment block in #Tbilisi #georgia 🇬🇪
  • 683 20 21 February, 2019

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  • Tastee Freez shops began their march across America in 1950, catering to our seemingly infinite appetite for ice cream, particularly at midcentury. There were thousands of locations by the late 1950s, and the chain became a trusted roadside presence, like Dairy Queen. There are only a few dozen Tastee Freez locations left, and this is not one of them — at least, it no longer is. It’s now called RJ’s Place, and it’s a beautifully preserved original Tastee Freez building in Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina, where I have family and visit regularly. RJ’s has long caught my eye. It’s a popular spot — you cook good comfort food and they will come. One can’t always shoot it free of cars, so I am glad I was driving by at the golden hour a while back when I spied this tranquil little scene. That’s a sweet slice of Americana! #retrologist #northcarolinaliving #northcarolinaphotographer
  • Tastee Freez shops began their march across America in 1950, catering to our seemingly infinite appetite for ice cream, particularly at midcentury. There were thousands of locations by the late 1950s, and the chain became a trusted roadside presence, like Dairy Queen. There are only a few dozen Tastee Freez locations left, and this is not one of them — at least, it no longer is. It’s now called RJ’s Place, and it’s a beautifully preserved original Tastee Freez building in Fuquay-Varina, North Carolina, where I have family and visit regularly. RJ’s has long caught my eye. It’s a popular spot — you cook good comfort food and they will come. One can’t always shoot it free of cars, so I am glad I was driving by at the golden hour a while back when I spied this tranquil little scene. That’s a sweet slice of Americana! #retrologist #northcarolinaliving #northcarolinaphotographer
  • 1,099 42 21 February, 2019

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  • This picture just spent all night crying to The Cure 🎼
  • This picture just spent all night crying to The Cure 🎼
  • 316 5 2 hours ago

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  • Greetings from England, where I’m on vacation, hunting for all things “roadside Brittania,” as opposed to the Americana you usually see here. One of my first visits was to the site of the original HMV (His Master’s Voice) record store, which opened at this location in 1921 and once thrived as a global empire. I have fond memories of shopping at the HMV locations in Manhattan in the 1990s and early 2000s, golden times for retail entertainment stores. Alas, the same economic and societal forces that undid the New York stores have been stalking the chain in the United Kingdom for years, and HMV recently closed all of its 127 stores here, including the iconic Oxford Street location featuring Nipper and the gramophone, which would also become the symbol for RCA and other related brands. Now, if you think this is another wistful lament for what was, then I have a twist ending for you! A Canadian businessman with a track record of turning around record stores has scooped up HMV here and has begun to reopen stores. According to The Guardian, high on Doug Putman’s list is reviving the iconic Oxford Street store, which he’s happy to run at a loss if necessary. If he can’t work out a deal, he’d love to reopen the flagship nearby. HMV carrying on without this “high street” presence would be a sad thing indeed, so I wish him well. The best part? He wants to focus the stores on vinyl (back to HMV’s roots) and allow each to develop its unique style, not follow some corporate mandate. I like the sound of that. His Master’s Voice has not been silenced. #retrologist #londonist #london_city_photo
  • Greetings from England, where I’m on vacation, hunting for all things “roadside Brittania,” as opposed to the Americana you usually see here. One of my first visits was to the site of the original HMV (His Master’s Voice) record store, which opened at this location in 1921 and once thrived as a global empire. I have fond memories of shopping at the HMV locations in Manhattan in the 1990s and early 2000s, golden times for retail entertainment stores. Alas, the same economic and societal forces that undid the New York stores have been stalking the chain in the United Kingdom for years, and HMV recently closed all of its 127 stores here, including the iconic Oxford Street location featuring Nipper and the gramophone, which would also become the symbol for RCA and other related brands. Now, if you think this is another wistful lament for what was, then I have a twist ending for you! A Canadian businessman with a track record of turning around record stores has scooped up HMV here and has begun to reopen stores. According to The Guardian, high on Doug Putman’s list is reviving the iconic Oxford Street store, which he’s happy to run at a loss if necessary. If he can’t work out a deal, he’d love to reopen the flagship nearby. HMV carrying on without this “high street” presence would be a sad thing indeed, so I wish him well. The best part? He wants to focus the stores on vinyl (back to HMV’s roots) and allow each to develop its unique style, not follow some corporate mandate. I like the sound of that. His Master’s Voice has not been silenced. #retrologist #londonist #london_city_photo
  • 4 1 1 minute ago

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  • Hope in the dark 🙏🏻⚫️
  • Hope in the dark 🙏🏻⚫️
  • 19 3 22 minutes ago